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ALCAM, activated leukocyte cell adhesion molecule, is a type I membrane glycoprotein and a member of the immunoglobulin supergene family. It is also known as CD166, MEMD, SC-1/DM-GRASP/BEN in the chicken, and KG-CAM in the rat. ALCAM is expressed on thymic epithelial cells, activated B and T cells, and monocytes. ALCAM can bind itself homotypically and is also capable of binding CD6, NgCAM, and other, as of yet, unidentified brain proteins. ALCAM/CD6 interaction may be involved in T cell development and T cell regulation. Additionally, ALCAM/CD6 and ALCAM/NgCAM interactions may play roles in the nervous system. ALCAM has also been observed to be upregulated on highly metastasizing melanoma cell lines and may play a role in tumor migration. ALCAM is a 583 amino acid (aa) protein consisting of a 27 aa signal peptide, a 500 aa extracellular domain, a 24 aa transmembrane domain, and a 32 aa cytoplasmic domain. The extracellular domain of ALCAM contains 5 Ig-like domains of which the amino-terminal V1 domain is essential for ligand binding and ALCAM-mediated cell aggregation (1-4).  The ECD of mouse ALCAM shares 97.5% aa sequence identity with rat ALCAM ECD.